Day: May 17, 2021

Saudi Arabia Lifts Quarantine Requirement for COVID Vaccinated Foreign Visitors

Saudi Arabia announced on Sunday that foreign visitors arriving by air from most countries will no longer need to quarantine if they have been vaccinated against COVID-19.

Visitors from 20 other countries – including the United States, India, Britain, Germany, France and the United Arab Emirates – remain banned from entering the kingdom, however, under measures to curb the spread of the coronavirus.

The civil aviation authority (GACA) said that from May 20 non-Saudi visitors arriving in the kingdom from eligible countries by air who are fully vaccinated, or have had COVID-19 and recovered, will no longer have to spend seven days in government-approved hotels as long as they provide an official vaccination certificate upon arrival.

Currently, all travellers coming into the kingdom need to quarantine for a period of seven to 14 days depending on the countries where they are coming from, and provide negative PCR tests.

Under the new rules, anyone over the age of eight years old who is not vaccinated must quarantine on arrival in Saudi Arabia for seven days at their own expense as of May 20 and provide a negative PCR test on the sixth day of their arrival, GACA said.

They must also provide a valid health insurance policy to cover potential risks from COVID-19. They will also need to provide a negative PCR test taken no later than 72 hours before boarding their flight to the kingdom.

Separately, the Saudi ministry of interior announced that Saudi citizens are still banned from travelling to 13 countries through direct or indirect flights without prior permission form authorities due to COVID-19 risks.

ViacomCBS Says Ex-CBS CEO Moonves Won’t Get $120M Severance

ViacomCBS said Friday that former CBS CEO Les Moonves will not get his $120 million severance package from his firing in 2018, ending a long-running dispute over the money.

Moonves was ousted in 2018 after a company investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct spanning three decades found Moonves violated company policy and did not cooperate with the investigation.

But Moonves challenged the decision and his $120 million severance was set aside until the matter could be resolved.

On Friday, New York-based ViacomCBS said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that the matter had been resolved, the arbitration dismissed, and the $120 million would be going back to ViacomCBS in its entirety. It give no further details.

Moonves was one of television’s most influential figures, credited for turning around the fortunes of CBS when he took over as entertainment chief in 1995. He had been one of the highest-paid executives in the nation, making about $70 million a year at the end of his run with the company.

He was ousted after allegations from women who said he subjected them to mistreatment including forced oral sex, groping and retaliation if they resisted. Moonves has also denied any allegations of non-consensual sex.